How To Make The Modern Day Office Work For You

Computer desktop workspace setup

Image source: Hongkiat.com

As businesses strive to keep up with technology, they’re allowing more and more flexibility in how an employee works. And thanks to developments in technology and the internet, the modern day office now comes in all different kinds of shapes and sizes.

Naturally, one office space is never as effective as another. Each one generates a different atmosphere and environment that directly affects how you work. Fortunately, there are many ways to optimize your workspace no matter where it is.

We decided to take a look at 3 common types of the modern day office with a few basic tips on how you can improve your productivity at each one.

Personalize And Fine-Tune Your Desk

This standard office space is slowly being traded in for alternative working methods. It’s no mystery that your environment has a direct impact on your well-being. In most cases, we’re used to sitting an average of up to 8 hours in front of the desktop, which can take a toll on your health. From incorrect body posture and eye strain to carpel tunnel syndrome and back aches, the computer desk can be full of health risks over the long run.

Ergonomic office desk setup

Image Source: Lifehacker.com

But, you can improve them. While your office space might not be able to equal those of Google’s,  whose creative workspaces are geared to keeping their staff inspired, you can still try to get it suited to your own comfort level.  Try changing and practicing a few small things to improve your overall productivity like:

Create A Distraction Free Home Office

This is usually the office space for freelancers, outsourced or online workers, work at home moms, pro bloggers, and employees who live too far to commute. This type of office comes with great benefits. You save on gas, traveling time, money spent on lunch, and you can easily fit in personal appointments or schedule home deliveries.

Unfortunately, a ton of distractions exist. Working from the comfort of your own home doesn’t give you the same busy feeling of a productive business office.  Instead, you have easy access to your entertainment system, a cozy bed, and your spacious backyard.

Home office computer station

Image Credit: Nico Kaiser

How do you keep your worker hat on? For starters, try to:

  • separate your work area from your relaxation areas  like your living room or bedroom
  • work in a place where you’ll be the least distracted
  • set up times for taking breaks around the house and follow them
  • keep the TV and other entertainment units off
  • set up your workstation just as you would have it set up in a regular office
  • keep your desk minimalistic and neat

Get A Tailored Set Up For Your Mobile Device

In a post-PC world that’s focused on mobile gadgets, the concept of the “mobile office” is now more widely accepted. Many companies in fact are turning to a mobile workforce, which makes sense as it saves time, increases productivity and reduces overhead costs. And you can get your work done from wherever you are.

Mobile smartphone keyboard

Image Credit: Johan Larsson

Despite this, working on a mobile device does have some drawbacks. You’re restricted to a small screen size, a touch-screen keyboard, and limited hardware resources.  Under those conditions, you need to find the right set up and the perfect balance to working effectively on a single device.

As a mobile worker, consider a few adjustments like:

  • getting a separate keyboard for your device
  • using a device with an adequate screen size
  • working on your device to get the small things done
  • getting mobile versions of desktop tools you use daily, like PDF converter apps and word processors
  • backing up your work and data to one central location (desktop, online or removable storage)

There are a dozen of little tweaks you can make to keep your productivity levels up.  These are just a few. So start taking careful stock of your workspace and figure out if your current set up is helping or hindering your work.